Alongside the evolution of HSCT, the advancement of chimerism monitoring has played a central role in enabling clinicians to better evaluate engraftment status and improve clinical decision-making after allogenic HSCT.

Chimerism monitoring: is there a new gold standard on the horizon?

Chimerism monitoring after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) plays a key role in assessing engraftment status and predicting serious complications to allow timely and effective therapeutic intervention.  For optimal clinical utility, assays for chimerism monitoring need to be highly sensitive, accurate and precise across a wide dynamic range.

Here’s why today’s most widely used chimerism assays fall short of the ideal, and why the latest high-sensitivity technology has the potential to set a new ‘gold standard’ for chimerism assessment.

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Chimerism monitoring: is there a new gold standard on the horizon?

Chimerism monitoring after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) plays a key role in assessing engraftment status and predicting serious complications to allow timely and effective therapeutic intervention.  For optimal clinical utility, assays for chimerism monitoring need to be highly sensitive, accurate and precise across a wide dynamic range.

Here’s why today’s most widely used chimerism assays fall short of the ideal, and why the latest high-sensitivity technology has the potential to set a new ‘gold standard’ for chimerism assessment.